I am a Psychologist specialising in risk behaviour, health behaviour and technology. I have a keen interest in the application of behaviour change techniques particularly those involving technological interventions – whether this relates to interventions delivered via technology, and/or interventions to target behaviour linked to technology usage (e.g., risky online behaviour).

My ESRC funded doctoral research investigated online risk taking (for example, sharing personal information, engaging in dangerous online pranks) and access to risky online content (e.g., content depicting drug use, binge drinking, eating disorders, self-harm etc.). I explored the factors mediating and moderating willingness to engage in online risk, and the application of theoretical models (e.g., the Prototype Willingness Model). I also investigated links between content viewed online and users own offline behaviour.

In 2014, I was awarded an RCUK International Fellowship at the Library of Congress, Washington D.C as the first external researcher to access the LoC’s Twitter archive. Whilst there I worked closely alongside the LoC team to help advise on the future development and use of the archive, whilst also collecting Twitter and Tumblr data for my own research around online communication about self-harm, suicide and eating disorders.
I have collaborated on a range of projects, for example researching the pros and cons of mobile phone apps for victims of domestic abuse (and apps used by the perpetrators!) with the Durham Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (CRiVA), and a trip to the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology, Westminster, to discuss the implications of social media research for future policy.

I also have a keen interest in health behaviour, including how technology based interventions and tools can be used to promote positive behaviours. I have previously managed two major health and social psychology projects at the University of Leeds: 1). The Steps Towards Explaining Psychological Processes in Suicide (STEPPS) project looking at links between daily stressors, cortisol levels, suicide ideation and well-being and 2). A Yorkshire Cancer Research project ran in conjunction with the NHS, North East Bowel Cancer Screening Hub, and NHS Digital using a randomised controlled trial to test a new intervention to increase Bowel Cancer Screening Uptake (incorporating implementation intentions and the social norms approach).

I am primarily a mixed-methods researcher, appreciating the advantages of using both qualitative and quantitative research. I have collected and analysed a wide range of digital data, e.g., social media photos and profiles, online survey data, tweets and blogs. I hold a Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy Certificate for coding competence of complex behaviour change interventions from University College London (UCL).

I am now a Research Associate within the Psychology and Communication Technology (PaCT) Lab at Northumbria University, where I am involved with the Horizon 2020 CYBECO project looking at supporting cyberinsurance from a behavioural choice perspective.

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Username:
dbranley
Email:
dawn.branley@northumbria.ac.uk
First Name:
Dawn
Last Name:
Branley
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dbranley
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Dawn Branley
Description:
I am a Psychologist specialising in risk behaviour, health behaviour and technology. I have a keen interest in the application of behaviour change techniques particularly those involving technological interventions – whether this relates to interventions delivered via technology, and/or interventions to target behaviour linked to technology usage (e.g., risky online behaviour). My ESRC funded doctoral research investigated online risk taking (for example, sharing personal information, engaging in dangerous online pranks) and access to risky online content (e.g., content depicting drug use, binge drinking, eating disorders, self-harm etc.). I explored the factors mediating and moderating willingness to engage in online risk, and the application of theoretical models (e.g., the Prototype Willingness Model). I also investigated links between content viewed online and users own offline behaviour. In 2014, I was awarded an RCUK International Fellowship at the Library of Congress, Washington D.C as the first external researcher to access the LoC’s Twitter archive. Whilst there I worked closely alongside the LoC team to help advise on the future development and use of the archive, whilst also collecting Twitter and Tumblr data for my own research around online communication about self-harm, suicide and eating disorders. I have collaborated on a range of projects, for example researching the pros and cons of mobile phone apps for victims of domestic abuse (and apps used by the perpetrators!) with the Durham Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (CRiVA), and a trip to the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology, Westminster, to discuss the implications of social media research for future policy. I also have a keen interest in health behaviour, including how technology based interventions and tools can be used to promote positive behaviours. I have previously managed two major health and social psychology projects at the University of Leeds: 1). The Steps Towards Explaining Psychological Processes in Suicide (STEPPS) project looking at links between daily stressors, cortisol levels, suicide ideation and well-being and 2). A Yorkshire Cancer Research project ran in conjunction with the NHS, North East Bowel Cancer Screening Hub, and NHS Digital using a randomised controlled trial to test a new intervention to increase Bowel Cancer Screening Uptake (incorporating implementation intentions and the social norms approach). I am primarily a mixed-methods researcher, appreciating the advantages of using both qualitative and quantitative research. I have collected and analysed a wide range of digital data, e.g., social media photos and profiles, online survey data, tweets and blogs. I hold a Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy Certificate for coding competence of complex behaviour change interventions from University College London (UCL). I am now a Research Associate within the Psychology and Communication Technology (PaCT) Lab at Northumbria University, where I am involved with the Horizon 2020 CYBECO project looking at supporting cyberinsurance from a behavioural choice perspective.